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Voting Myths

Myth versus Truth – Voters with Disabilities

MYTH: I can’t vote because I will lose my disability check.
          TRUTH: Voting has no effect on persons who are receiving disability checks.

MYTH: I can’t vote because I live in a group home.
          TRUTH: If you live in a group home, you can register at that address to vote.

MYTH: I can’t vote because I am receiving treatment in a hospital.
          TRUTH: Voters who are receiving treatment in a hospital can vote by absentee ballot.  Voters admitted to the hospital as an emergency patient on Election Day or within 4 days of the election can ask a member of the voter’s immediate family to apply and sign the absentee application, receive the ballot and return the ballot. This will still apply if the voter is released from the hospital on Election Day.

MYTH: I can’t vote because I have a disability.
TRUTH: Voting in S.C. is accessible to all voters. Electronic voting machines are portable for wheelchair use and audio ballots are available county precincts.  Curbside voting is also available at every precinct for voters with disabilities.  Absentee voting by mail or in person prior to the election is also an option.

MYTH: I can’t vote because I have an intellectual disability
          TRUTH: An intellectual disability does not disqualify you from voting.

MYTH: I can’t vote because I need assistance
          TRUTH: Voters with disabilities and voters who are unable to read or write may ask for assistance in the voting booth. If you need assistance in marking your ballot, ask the poll manager.  You can choose the person you want to assist you as long as they are not their employer, an agent of their employer, an officer of their union, or an agent of their union.             

MYTH: I can’t vote because I don’t live on my own.
          TRUTH: Living independently is not a requirement to vote.

MYTH: I can’t vote because I am deaf.
          TRUTH: Each precinct offers and ADA compliant voting machine featuring Braille-embossed buttons.                  

MYTH:  People with disabilities must always be accompanied by someone to vote
          TRUTH: Any voter may choose to vote independently, and requesting assistance is always an option for a voter with a disability.

MYTH: People with disabilities can’t drive, so they can’t vote
          TRUTH: Driving is not required to vote.  If you lack transportation to the polls, you may always vote absentee by mail.

MYTH: People with disabilities must vote inside the building
         TRUTH: Voters with disabilities may vote inside or outside the polling place.  If the voter chooses to vote outside, park in the curbside voting area.

MYTH: People with disabilities must vote curbside
         TRUTH: Voters with disabilities may vote inside or outside the polling place.  If the voter chooses to vote outside, park in the curbside voting area.